Week Three: Gaza!

30 January – Day 14

I had to get up at 6:15am today (Saturday) in order to get to HQ for the shuttle to Jerusalem by 8:30. I made some balsamic vinaigrette and ranch dressing in the morning, and packed up all the food. Upon arriving to my hotel around 11:30, I promptly passed out for 3 hours.. again, I’ve always been a napper, but I was hoping to not feel as tired as I have been lately. I haven’t worked out in 5 days or so, which might be contributing, but I don’t know what’s going on. After my nap, I did the same thing I did in Lebanon, and got a ½ kg of chicken shawarma from a Turkish kebab place. Again, I think most of the spices are likely compliant, but I just don’t know for sure. However, there’s only so much I have control over, and I didn’t want to dip into my canned food supply, as it will be more difficult to get my hands on fresh meats in Gaza.

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The veggie shop in Jerusalem where I grabbed some essentials for the coming days.. All for about $2

31 January – Day 15

Officially into week 3 of my Whole30!! I didn’t wake up with the much anticipated “tiger blood,” but it may be that I am behind schedule due to some accidental cheats. Hopefully I feel it in the next week!

I arrived in Gaza this morning with a massive shopping bag of food. I will ask the driver to take me to a fruit/veggie stand where I can stock up on the way to the hotel. I’d also like to pick up a rotisserie chicken (they have them all over the place here at the chicken shops) so that I can make a protein salad/have it for my lunches. I will hopefully get a hotel room with a mini fridge which will allow me to keep the eggs, meats and sauces cold.

I ordered lunch from the canteen upon arrival to the field office, as I was starving, and was told I’d get “plain, grilled chicken” over a salad. The chicken definitely had spcies, on it, which I think was zataar (which has sesame seeds), but it also had a hint of curry. I have no idea if it was compliant or not. I’m inclined to think so, but this is another one of those situations where I can’t just throw the food out because perhaps the chicken has something non-compliant on it. The book says something along the lines of “you’re a grownup, no one is forcing you to eat non-compliant food, you are always making a decision to cheat.” While I understand the sentiment, I do feel that in a situation like Gaza, turning down, throwing away, or sending back food is simply inappropriate, rude, and ungrateful. I would rather slip up accidentally than turn away food in a setting where food is scarce. It’s like the way I felt when I first traveled to Kenya after 12 years of vegetarianism. I made a conscious decision to begin eating meat again before taking my trip, because I did not want to impose my “first world food preferences” on those for whom slaughtering a goat to celebrate my presence was an act of great honor – and sacrifice. It’s true, no one is forcing me to eat the food, but from a humanitarian perspective, it’s akin to the religious reverence some people give to taking Communion. I am not forced, but I am compelled, and I am ok with that.

1 February – Day 16

Help, I’m still exhausted. No tiger blood yet. Sad face.

2 & 3 February – Day 17 and 18

Still tired, but working a lot in Gaza, and am out and about visiting installations and attending stressful meetings. I also haven’t been deathly tired..just, like, don’t want to get out of bed, normal tired. Have had to be pretty boring the past couple of nights and order just plain chicken from room service, to put with the fruits and veggies I have been buying (which are so fresh and delicious). It’s been great having the ranch and balsamic vinaigrettes to spice up the meals, as they’re certainly boring. My breakfasts haven’t been too bad (the hotel does the standard fried eggs, pita bread, cheese and hummus spread, so I’ve been eating in my room). I brought hardboiled eggs with me, the avocados here are delicious, and the cherry tomatoes taste like candy, so I’ve just been chopping them all together with some hot sauce, salt and pepper in the mornings. Then I usually have a grapefruit or orange and a cucumber to munch on as I walk out. I ate my last two hardboiled eggs today, so might have to open the canned salmon or repurpose the grilled chicken in the morning!

I’ll be really happy when I get home late tomorrow night and know I’ll be home for the rest of the 30, and hopefully in the 45 and reintroduction phase (will have to come back to Gaza in the coming weeks, but not sure when). At least now I know what to do and how much I need to get through!

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Very satisfying breakfasts

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Notice the french fries that it took all of my willpower to leave alone!!

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I’m pretty sure the kebabs were compliant…and delicious

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Turns out there’s an incredibly high amount of pesticides in Gaza’s fruits and veggies.. which makes them incredibly tasty and huge…

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Cleaning the lettuce, and making food in general in my hotel room was hilarious. But the part where my towel had a scented detergent that seeped into the lettuce was not.

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